Dr Alexis Colvin discusses the extent of Jason Pierre-Paul’s injury

Posted by on Dec 14, 2016 in Dr. Alexis C. Colvin, Health | No Comments
Dr Alexis Colvin discusses the extent of Jason Pierre-Paul’s injury

“The extent is going to be if there’s any tearing and whether or not it needs to be surgically fixed,” said Dr. Alexis Colvin, an Orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “If it does need surgery, he could be out 6-12 weeks and it’ll probably be closer to 12 weeks just because of the fact that he goes back to professional football. But if it’s just a strain, then it could be as short as a week to a week-and-a-half.”

Mount Sinai Health Beat: What You Can Do About Tennis Injuries

Posted by on Nov 29, 2016 in Dr. Alexis C. Colvin, Health | No Comments
Mount Sinai Health Beat: What You Can Do About Tennis Injuries

Welcome to the Mount Sinai Health Beat, a feature with the official medical provider of USTA Eastern, USTA, and the US Open. This month, James Gladstone, MD, Co-Chief of the Sports Medicine Service at The Mount Sinai Hospital, talks about avoiding injuries: For the last several years working at the US Open, I have spent much of […]

Dr Alexis Colvin talks sports recovery importance

Posted by on Jul 22, 2016 in Dr. Alexis C. Colvin, Health | No Comments
Dr Alexis Colvin talks sports recovery importance

“Without proper recovery, athletes may experience burnout and feel staleness with their sport,” says Dr. Colvin. Symptoms such as increased irritability, anger, exhaustion, or reduced motivation may indicate a stressed mental state. “Take time to check in with yourself after play to make sure you’re still enjoying the activity and not overworking yourself,” says Dr. Colvin.

Exercising During Pregnancy

Posted by on Jun 1, 2016 in Dr. Alexis C. Colvin, Health | No Comments
Exercising During Pregnancy

Dr. Alexis Colvin, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital, continued exercising during her own three pregnancies.

Women who exercise throughout a pregnancy tend to experience less fatigue and swelling, as well as fewer incidents of varicose veins, Colvin said. Psychologically, exercise can also help improve a mother’s mood and self-esteem.

“If you are exercising pre-pregnancy, you should absolutely keep it up,” said Colvin, formerly a physician at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Running, bone density and Dr. Alexis Colvin

Posted by on Apr 28, 2016 in Dr. Alexis C. Colvin, Health | No Comments
Running, bone density and Dr. Alexis Colvin

“While any type of weight-bearing exercise is recommended to maintain bone density and reduce osteoperosis, excessive running can lead to the opposite problem of stress fractures, seconds Alexis Colvin, M.D., an orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Not to mention, the study only looked at the density of the heel bone, and not other bones that are typically measured for osteoporosis, such as the hip or lumbar spine, she explains.”

Dr. Alexis Colvin chimes in on Stephen Curry’s knee sprain

Dr. Alexis Colvin chimes in on Stephen Curry’s knee sprain

“I’d say it’s one of the best-case scenarios because he does not need surgery and it’ll recover completely on its own,” said Dr. Colvin, who was speaking generally and without direct knowledge of Curry’s case. “It depends on how quickly he feels he’s up to speed. But he’s in good shape to begin with, and it’s not a very severe injury.”

Photo by: David J. Phillip/Associated Press

Dr Alexis Colvin talks about the benefits of lightweight marathon blankets

Posted by on Nov 15, 2015 in Dr. Alexis C. Colvin, Health | No Comments
Dr Alexis Colvin talks about the benefits of lightweight marathon blankets

The human body’s temperature rises over the course of the marathon. Even after completing the race, marathoners continue to shed heat. But if the conditions are cold, they could lose that heat too rapidly and run the risk of hypothermia, a dangerous drop in core body temperature.

“Your body is still trying to get rid of that extra heat, even though it’s colder outside,” said Dr. Alexis Colvin, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. “You can become hypothermic if your body hasn’t quite re-established the balance between getting rid of the heat and keeping the heat in.”

Dr James Gladstone talks about heat related injuries during the US Open

Posted by on Oct 25, 2015 in Dr. James Gladstone, Health, US Open | No Comments
Dr James Gladstone talks about heat related injuries during the US Open

“When it’s 90 degrees out there and it really feels like over a hundred — especially on the courts, they’re almost like saunas — they’ve got to pay special attention to staying well-hydrated,” Dr. James Gladstone, medical services provider at the 2015 U.S. Open and co-chief of sports medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, told CBS News.

Dr Alexis Colvin talks about cutting corners on nutrition

Posted by on Sep 9, 2015 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Dr Alexis Colvin talks about cutting corners on nutrition

There’s been a dramatic increase in the number of girls playing sports in high school, and the women’s participation rate in college sports jumped to more than 40 percent. But, many aren’t getting enough calories and protein. That can mean poor performance, bone fractures and other serious problems. Dr. Alexis Colvin, chief medical officer of the U.S. Tennis Association and orthopedic surgeon, joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss the health risks for women.

Alexis Colvin, MD, Keeps Players at the Top of Their Game

Posted by on Aug 17, 2015 in Dr. Alexis C. Colvin, Health, US Open | No Comments
Alexis Colvin, MD, Keeps Players at the Top of Their Game

When athletic powerhouse Serena Williams steps onto the tennis court at the 2015 U.S. Open, Alexis Colvin, MD, will be on hand, ready to provide medical care to Ms. Williams and the rest of the athletes, should any orthopaedic issues arise.

Dr. Colvin, who acts as a United States Tennis Association (USTA) physician during the U.S. Open, is also the chief medical officer for the USTA, team physician for the U.S. Fed Cup team, and an associate professor of sports medicine in the department of orthopaedic surgery at New York City’s Mount Sinai Hospital. As a sports medicine specialist, Dr. Colvin relishes her work with the USTA, and aims to help tennis players of all levels improve their playing ability while avoiding injuries.